Sign up to follow this blog by email. You will be sent posts automatically!

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Happy Autumn!

This week the CSA pickup is WEDNESDAY, November 23rd starting at 2:30pm. And because people are asking already…the last day of the CSA is December 15th.

If you know you won’t be picking up your CSA food this week (and no one will be picking up for you) PLEASE let us know by responding to this email and saying so.
Why? It’s so we could leave before 7:30pm if everyone has shown up who’s going to, and whoever isn’t checked off yet isn’t coming (so we don’t have to wait around in case they do show up). If someone can’t make it till 7:30pm, that’s fine, but if we can all leave earlier…I’m sure we all could use the time. And if you need to pick up later than 7:30pm, call the CSA between 2pm and 6pm at 631-385-1079 and let whoever answers the phone from the CSA know when you’ll be picking up, and we could leave a bag at the usual local late night spot (or the Cinema Arts Centre Box Office…state your preference).

Where are all the seeds from the Farsi Winter Squashes??? PLEASE save and return them (see below). Farmer Bill got the seeds when he was in Nepal so if you don’t return them, he can’t buy more and he’s not going back to Nepal any time soon…if ever.

PLEASE!!! I BEG OF YOU…DO NOT bring in Farsi Winter Squash seeds that are…wet (not even damp), in a plastic bag, unlabelled, and not Farsi Winter Squash seeds!!! They need to be the correct seeds, bone dry (may take one to two weeks) and then, and only then, put in something that breathes (NO – plastic/wax paper/parchment paper/tin foil, YES – paperbag, newspaper, paper towel, tissues, heck – even toilet paper), labeled Farsi Winter Squash (we weren’t asked to save any other one we received…Acorn and Butternut’s what I recall). And please don’t eat them. The farm needs them much more than anyone’s tummy does. These seeds are not available in this country and none of the Halseys are going to Nepal anytime soon to acquire more. If you want to grow them yourself, keep 10 (way more than enough) and give the rest back. Any questions, I’d be happy to answer (no question is too anything to not be asked…I think that’s what I’m trying to say ).

One of our CSA members told me that her doctor said she can’t wear flip flops. I don’t remember who it was to send her this info directly (sorry whoever you are  !). I told her Dr. Andrew Weil had info about flip flops that don’t do the damage the regular ones do and here’s the info (it’s never too early to be thinking about next summer  )…
http://www.orthaheelusa.com/women/sandals.html?utm_source=drweil&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=051011


This week’s email includes…

1. HELP! Your CSA needs you this week!!! We’re looking for ONE (1) person from 2:30 to 4:30pm, and ONE (1) person from 4:30 to 6:30pm, and THREEE (3) folks from 6:30 to 7:30pm (and any combination therein…from 2:30 to 7:30, 4:30 to 7:30, 2:30 to 6:30…whatever)…
2. Think global, drink local!
3. This week’s list…subject to change without notice (farming is like that)…
4. Dr Andrew Weil’s take on root vegetables (with recipe)…
5. Saving seeds
6. And now for something completely different…


1. HELP! Your CSA needs you this week!!! We’re looking for ONE (1) person from 3:30 to 5:30pm and ONE (1) person from 5:30 to 7:30pm…

If you can be at the CSA from either 2:30 to 4:30pm, or 4:30 to 6:30pm, OR 6:30pm to 7:30pm this week please…
1. Respond to this email before 1pm Wednesday
2. Call 631-421-4864 and leave a message before 1pm Wednesday
2. Call the CSA at 631-385-1079 after 2pm WEDNESDAY ONLY and ask to speak to someone from the CSA and leave a message
3. Show up a little before 2:30pm or 4:30pm or 6:30pm, and see if there’s still any help needed

You can ALWAYS stop by the CSA a little before 2:30 or 4:30 or 6:30 (this week anyway) to offer to help in case someone doesn’t show up (or is late) without letting anyone know.

If you’re waiting to see how many hours you’ve worked, that info will be emailed out by Wednesday AM.



2. Think global, drink local!

This holiday season, drink local…and responsibly, of course!

Here’s a wine merchant with a tasting cellar specializing in NY State wines, located in Riverhead at the Tanger Mall (and sign up for their email newsletter and “like” their Facebook page)…
http://www.empirestatecellars.com/

And along the same line, here’s a recipe (accredited to Daily Candy’s Nana) that can be made with NY’s own Hudson Baby Bourbon Whiskey…
http://www.tuthilltown.com/category/products/aged-spirits
Bourbon Sweet Potato Souffle
Serves six to eight
Ingredients
1 c. white sugar
1 stick salted butter, softened
6-8 lg. sweet potatoes (not yams)
3 eggs
1 tsp. vanilla
½ c. bourbon
1 c. walnuts, chopped
1 tsp. butter
Directions
1. Preheat oven to 350°.
1. In a medium bowl, beat together sugar and butter until smooth.
2. Peel sweet potatoes, then boil until soft, about 20 minutes (test with fork). Cube and set aside in a large round casserole dish to cool.
3. When the potatoes are cool, separate the eggs and add the yolks to potatoes (save the egg whites). Blend with a hand mixer until smooth, then add sugar and butter mixture until thoroughly blended.
4. Stir in vanilla and bourbon with spoon.
5. In a separate bowl, beat egg whites with hand mixer until stiff.
6. Gently fold whites into potato mixture; do not mix.
7. Bake for 30 minutes. To prevent souffle from falling, do not open oven door while cooking. While souffle bakes, lightly toast walnuts in remaining butter.
8. Once it is cool, top with buttered walnuts.
9. Devour.


3. This week’s list…subject to change without notice (farming is like that!)

November 23, 2011

1. Kale: Siberian, White – 1 bunch
2. Lettuce
3. Rutabagas
4. Sage OR Savory, Winter* – 1 bunch
5. Fennel
6. Scallions – 1 bunch

Total Items: 6

Herb Share – Nov 2B
Thyme AND Rosemary

*Winter Savory (supposed anti-flatulence herb if cooked with Beans)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winter_savory
http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/learn/savory_winter.php
http://www.hipherb.com/garden/herb/winter_savory



4. Dr Andrew Weil’s take on root vegetables (with recipe)…

Dr Weil’s thoughts on why it’s a good thing to be eating Root Vegetables…
http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/TIP04258/Cheap-Filling-and-Nutritious-Root-Veggies.html

Dr Andrew Weil’s Roasted Root Vegetable Recipe…
http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/RCP00221/roasted-root-vegetables.html

If you want to know exactly what a Root Vegetable is…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_root_vegetables



5. Saving Seeds

It’s that time of year again when Farmer Bill asks us to save the seeds for one or two varieties of our Winter Squashes.

How to save Winter Squash seeds…

Mission…

1. Remove gunk
2. Dry out
3. prevent mold
4. Label correctly

If any of these actions are not accomplished the seeds need to be thrown out and your efforts will have been wasted

It’s VERY important to make sure you have the correct seeds saved and to label them correctly. If you don’t do this, the incorrect plant may hybridize with another similar plant which defeats the efforts of saving the seeds…it’s being done to save a particular variety of plant – not to create a new one.

1. Remove seeds from Winter Squash and get off all the gunk (not a botanical or culinary term but the best I can come up with at the moment) by putting the seeds in a bowl of water and rubbing the gunk off COMPLETELY
2. Once all the gunk is off, drain off the water in a colander
3. Spread out the seeds in a single layer on a baking tray or a large piece of cardboard or any non-porous surface (don’t use newspapers or paper towels as it may stick to the seeds and…there are reasons but the short version is the farmer doesn’t want ANYTHING stuck to the seeds)
4. Every day move the seeds around to help facilitate drying and prevent mold
5. Let them dry for a week or two…longer than you think would possibly be necessary (do not try and speed process along by drying in a microwave or oven…it will kill the seed…yes, it’s been done by CSA members in the past)
6. When completely dry, pack in a paper bag or wrap in newspaper (NEVER in anything plastic) and label exactly what they are…This week I believe it will be Winter Squash - Farsi
7. Save a few for yourself if you wish to grow them next season in your own garden but please return the rest to the CSA (leave at the sign-in table) as the farm needs them more than you do

Any questions about seed saving…please ask.



6. And now for something completely different…

A unique Thanksgiving leftover recipe from the cookbook The Food52 Cookbook by Amanda Hesser (used to write for the NY Times Dining section) and Merrill Stubbs…

(They also have an iPad app that’s a holiday recipe/survival guide…
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/food52-holiday-recipe-survival/id479448314?mt=8 )

Turkey pho by Winnie Ab

Makes: 2 big bowls of soup
• 1 quart homemade turkey stock (or homemade or store-bought chicken stock)
• 1 bunch scallions (green top parts only), chopped
• One 3-inch chunk of ginger, sliced and smashed with side of a knife
• 1 teaspoon light brown sugar, or more to taste
• 1 tablespoon fish sauce, or more to taste
• 1 to 2 cups kale, chopped into bite-size pieces
• 1/2 pound leftover turkey breast, shredded
• 1 bunch (about 2 ounces) cellophane or bean thread noodles (or enough flat dried rice noodles to serve 2)
• 1 ½ tablespoons chopped cilantro, for garnish (optional)
• 1 ½ tablespoons chopped scallions (white parts only), for garnish (optional)
• Sriracha hot sauce
• 1/2 lime, cut into wedges
Heat a cast-iron skillet or frying pan over medium heat. Add the spices and toast until fragrant, 3 to 4 minutes. Immediately spoon the spices into a bowl to avoid burning them.
Add the toasted spices, stock, scallions, ginger, brown sugar, and fish sauce to a large pot and bring to a boil over high heat.
Reduce the heat to medium-low and let simmer for 20 minutes, skimming the surface frequently.
Taste the broth and add more sugar or fish sauce if needed. Strain the broth and discard the solids. Add the kale and cook for 1 to 2 more minutes. Remove from heat.
Add the turkey and noodles. Allow to sit for a few minutes while the noodles soften.
Ladle the broth into 2 bowls. Divide the kale, turkey and noodles evenly between the bowls.
Sprinkle on the garnishes and add Sriracha to taste. Squeeze lime juice to taste before eating.
###

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Happy Autumn!

Next week is the week of Thanksgiving and the pickup is WEDNESDAY, November 23rd. Watch your emails as the pickup time may be a bit earlier as I’m sure many of us need to head out of town, or get as much food shopping done as early as possible (and our farmer would like to get on the road ASAP to deal with holiday traffic headed east).

Because people are asking already…the last day of the CSA is December 15th.

Where are all the seeds from the Farsi Winter Squashes??? PLEASE save and return them (see below). Farmer Bill got the seeds when he was in Nepal so if you don’t return them, he can’t buy more and he’s not going back to Nepal any time soon…if ever.

This week’s email includes…

1. HELP! Your CSA needs you this week!!! We’re looking for ONE (1) person from 3:30 to 5:30pm and ONE (1) person from 5:30 to 7:30pm…
2. GREAT article on why buying local Honey is the way to go (know your beekeeper!)…
3. This week’s list…subject to change without notice (farming is like that)…
4. Buying local is now big business…about $4.8 BILLION dollars worth in 2008 and possibly up to $7 BILLION this year!
5. Saving seeds


1. HELP! Your CSA needs you this week!!! We’re looking for ONE (1) person from 3:30 to 5:30pm and ONE (1) person from 5:30 to 7:30pm…

If you can be at the CSA from either 3:30 to 5:30pm or 5:30 to 7:30pm this week please…
1. Respond to this email before 1pm Thursday
2. Call 631-421-4864 and leave a message before 1pm Thursday
2. Call the CSA at 631-385-1079 after 3pm THURSDAY ONLY and ask to speak to someone from the CSA and leave a message
3. Show up a little before 3:30pm or 5:30pm and see if there’s still any openings

You can ALWAYS stop by the CSA a little before 3:30 or 5:30 to offer to help in case someone doesn’t show up (or is late) without letting anyone know.



2. GREAT article on why buying local Honey is the way to go (know your beekeeper!)…

And read your ingredient labels! If there’s Honey in it you might want to put it back on the shelf (unless you know and trust the company as to where that Honey is coming from…but THEY might not know they’ve been deceived)…
http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2011/11/tests-show-most-store-honey-isnt-honey/



3. This week’s list…subject to change without notice (farming is like that!)

November 10, 2011

1. Cauliflower: Cheddar OR Purple – 1 head total
2. Lettuce – 1 bag
3. Collard Greens – 1 bunch
4. Jerusalem Artichokes – 1 bag
5. Mizuna: Green OR Red – 1 bunch total
6. Carrots: Rainbow – 1 bunch

Total Items: 6



4. Buying local is now big business…about $4.8 BILLION dollars worth in 2008 and possibly up to $7 BILLION this year!

More individuals and businesses are buying local and the numbers show it! Yeah!!!

http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/usda-locally-grown-food-a-48-billion-business-much-bigger-than-previously-thought/2011/11/14/gIQAVj85JN_story.html



5. Saving Seeds

It’s that time of year again when Farmer Bill asks us to save the seeds for one or two varieties of our Winter Squashes.

How to save Winter Squash seeds…

Mission…remove gunk – dry out – prevent mold (if any of these actions are not accomplished the seeds need to be thrown out and your efforts will have been wasted) – label correctly (if you don’t do this, the incorrect plant may hybridize with another similar plant which defeats the efforts of saving the seeds…it’s being done to save a particular variety of plant – not to create a new one)

1. Remove seeds from Winter Squash and get off all the gunk (not a botanical or culinary term but the best I can come up with at the moment) by putting the seeds in a bowl of water and rubbing the gunk off COMPLETELY
2. Once all the gunk is off, drain off the water in a colander
3. Spread out the seeds in a single layer on a baking tray or a large piece of cardboard or any non-porous surface (don’t use newspapers or paper towels as it may stick to the seeds and…there are reasons but the short version is the farmer doesn’t want ANYTHING stuck to the seeds)
4. Every day move the seeds around to help facilitate drying and prevent mold
5. Let them dry for a week or two…longer than you think would possibly be necessary (do not try and speed process along by drying in a microwave or oven…it will kill the seed…yes, it’s been done by CSA members in the past)
6. When completely dry, pack in a paper bag or wrap in newspaper (NEVER in anything plastic) and label exactly what they are…This week I believe it will be Winter Squash - Farsi
7. Save a few for yourself if you wish to grow them next season in your own garden but please return the rest to the CSA (leave at the sign-in table) as the farm needs them more than you do

Any question…please ask.

###

Thursday, November 10, 2011

Happy Autumn!

Because people are asking already…the last day of the CSA is December 15th…and the CSA pickup day for the week of Thanksgiving is WEDNESDAY, November 23rd.

Where are all the seeds from the Farsi Winter Squashes??? We’re getting another batch this week so PLEASE save and return them (see below).

This week’s email includes…

1. HELP! Your CSA needs you this week!!! We’re looking for TWO (2) folks to be at the CSA from 5:30 to 7:30pm…
2. Notes from the Farm
3. This week’s list…subject to change without notice (farming is like that)…
4. Daikon salad recipe
5. Saving seeds


1. HELP! Your CSA needs you this week!!! We’re looking for TWO (2) folks for 5:30 to 7:30pm…

If you can be at the CSA from 5:30 to 7:30pm today please…
1. Respond to this email before 1pm
2. Call 631-421-4864 and leave a message before 1pm
2. Call the CSA at 631-385-1079 after 3pm and ask to speak to someone from the CSA and leave a message
3. Show up a little before 5:30pm and see if there’s still any openings

You can ALWAYS stop by the CSA a little before 3:30 or 5:30 to offer to help in case someone doesn’t show up (or is late) without letting anyone know.



2. Notes from the Farm

November 4, 2011

Our last CSA weeks are here, and our summer crops are done. We picked Beans and Tomatoes up till last week, and then the killing frost arrived and that was the end of that! We had a good season with our Beans and Tomatoes.

The next few weeks, we’ll be featuring greens and roots. We still have Scallions, Carrots, Radishes, Turnips, Kales, and some Kohlrabi. Our Cauliflowers and Broccolis have not done so well due to so much rain over the last two months. So much rain tended to wash away the fertilizer and compacted the soil… two things cole* crops don’t like.
*http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/vegetables/colecrop.html

As it is every year, some crops do well while other do not. Organic farming, and relying on the weather for your livelihood, can be challenging at times. By growing a wide variety of crops we always have something doing well. Next year will be no different with some crops doing well and others not…and you never know which ones will be which.

We are so thankful for the support and understanding of all our CSA members, as we strive to produce a wide range of certified organic vegetables, herbs and fruits.

Organically yours,
Farmer Bill



3. This week’s list…subject to change without notice (farming is like that!)

November 10, 2011

1. Tat Soi
2. Lettuce – 1 bag
3. Radishes: China Rose, China White, Daikon, Misato (Watermelon) – need to be weighed
4. Garlic
5. Scallions
6. Winter Squash: Farsi (SAVE THE SEEDS)

Total Items: 6(?)



4. Daikon salad recipe…

http://sarahscucinabella.com/2010/02/03/easy-daikon-salad-recipe/



5. Saving Seeds

It’s that time of year again when Farmer Bill asks us to save the seeds for one or two varieties of our Winter Squashes.

How to save Winter Squash seeds…

Mission…remove gunk – dry out – prevent mold (if any of these actions are not accomplished the seeds need to be thrown out and your efforts will have been wasted) – label correctly (if you don’t do this, the incorrect plant may hybridize with another similar plant which defeats the efforts of saving the seeds…it’s being done to save a particular variety of plant – not to create a new one)

1. Remove seeds from Winter Squash and get off all the gunk (not a botanical or culinary term but the best I can come up with at the moment) by putting the seeds in a bowl of water and rubbing the gunk off COMPLETELY
2. Once all the gunk is off, drain off the water in a colander
3. Spread out the seeds in a single layer on a baking tray or a large piece of cardboard or any non-porous surface (don’t use newspapers or paper towels as it may stick to the seeds and…there are reasons but the short version is the farmer doesn’t want ANYTHING stuck to the seeds)
4. Every day move the seeds around to help facilitate drying and prevent mold
5. Let them dry for a week or two…longer than you think would possibly be necessary (do not try and speed process along by drying in a microwave or oven…it will kill the seed…yes, it’s been done by CSA members in the past)
6. When completely dry, pack in a paper bag or wrap in newspaper (NEVER in anything plastic) and label exactly what they are…This week I believe it will be Winter Squash - Farsi
7. Save a few for yourself if you wish to grow them next season in your own garden but please return the rest to the CSA (leave at the sign-in table) as the farm needs them more than you do

Any question…please ask.

###