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Thursday, December 15, 2011

Happy Autumn!

Today is the last CSA pickup of the 2011 season.

That said, this will not be the last email as there are still loose ends to be tied up (paperwork and financial) and next year to think about (April…when the CSA starts up again…is not so far away). Contracts for next year will be emailed to current CSA members by early February and then in early March, contracts will be emailed to new interested folks.

Where are all the seeds from the Farsi Winter Squashes??? PLEASE save and return them (see below). Farmer Bill got the seeds when he was in Nepal so if you don’t return them, he can’t buy more and he’s not going back to Nepal any time soon…if ever.

PLEASE!!! I BEG OF YOU…DO NOT bring in Farsi Winter Squash seeds that are…wet (not even damp), in a plastic bag, unlabelled, and not Farsi Winter Squash seeds!!! They need to be the correct seeds, bone dry (may take one to two weeks) and then, and only then when they’re completely dry, put the seeds in something that breathes (NO – plastic/wax paper/parchment paper/tin foil, YES – paper bags, newspaper, paper towel, tissues, heck – even toilet paper), labeled Farsi Winter Squash (we weren’t asked to save any other one we received…Acorn and Butternut’s what I recall). And please don’t eat them. The farm needs them much more than anyone’s tummy does. These seeds are not available in this country and none of the Halseys are going to Nepal anytime soon to acquire more. If you want to grow them yourself, keep 10 (way more than enough) and give the rest back. Any questions, I’d be happy to answer (no question is too anything to not be asked…I think that’s what I’m trying to say ).

This week’s email includes…

1. HELP! Your CSA needs you this week!!! We’re looking for TWO (2) people from 3:30 to 5:30pm and ONE (1) person to help from 5:30 to 7:30pm…
2. Nice article on Biodynamic farming that mentions Green Thumb Farm…
3. This week’s list…subject to change without notice (farming is like that)…
4. Celery Root (Celeriac) Tutorial…
5. Saving seeds (FYI - the seeds will keep till next April if you don’t hand them this week)
6. Upcoming events


1. HELP! Your CSA needs you this week!!! We’re looking for TWO (2) people from 3:30 to 5:30pm and ONE (1) person to help from 5:30 to 7:30pm…

Whether you owe CSA hours or not…whether you even planned on working this season or not…you could offer to help out…regardless. Besides, at the start of the CSA you get “first dibs” and at end of the CSA you have the opportunity to take extra produce from what’s left. This must be appealing to somebody…yes?

If you can be at the CSA from 3:30 to 5:30pm or 5:30 to 7:30pm this week please…
1. Respond to this email before 1pm Thursday
2. Call 631-421-4864 and leave a message before 1pm Thursday
2. Call the CSA at 631-385-1079 after 3pm THURSDAY ONLY and ask to speak to someone from the CSA and leave a message
3. Show up a little before 3:30pm or 5:30pm and see if there’s still any help needed

You can ALWAYS stop by the CSA a little before 3:30 or 5:30 to offer to help in case someone doesn’t show up (or is late) without letting anyone know.



2. Nice article on Biodynamic farming that mentions Green Thumb Farm…

as well as Farmer Bill’s brother Larry Halsey and their brother-in-law, Steve Storch (married to sister JoHanna Halsey). Steve and Larry have both been to the Cinema Arts Centre in Huntington as featured speakers with films about food and farming and may do so again in the near future.

Also, I used to know Hugh Williams (one of the early known Biodynamic practitioners) back in the day not so much as a farmer, but as a fellow activist protesting the Shoreham nuclear power plant! And then was sad that soon afterwards, he moved upstate New York to become a very well respected organic/biodynamic/anarchist farmer in that part of the world (I selfishly wished he would remain farming on Long Island but with the price of land and taxes…need I say more?)…

http://www.edibleeastend.com/online_magazine/farming-to-a-different-beat/



3. This week’s list…subject to change without notice (farming is like that!)

Week #34
December 15, 2011

1. Celery Root (Celeriac) – 1
2. Daikon/Rutabaga/Turnip combo to be weighed
3. Carrots: Purple – 1 bunch
4. Squash, Winter: Farsi - 1
5. Jerusalem Artichokes – 1 bag
6. Peppers, Hot – 1 bag/box (?)

Total Items: 6 (?)



4. Celery Root (Celeriac) Tutorial…

Celeriac: The Vegetable World’s Ugly Duckling – nice NPR piece…
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6551175

How to peel and chop Celery Root (Celeriac)…
http://www.foodandwine.com/articles/giving-salad-a-spin-winter-salads/sidebars/1

Chef Jean Georges Vongerichten talks about Celery Root (Celeriac) and other things…
http://www.foodandwine.com/articles/giving-salad-a-spin-winter-salads

Celery Root (Celeriac) and Mushroom Lasagna…
http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/celery-root-and-mushroom-lasagna



5. Saving Seeds (FYI - the seeds will keep till next April if you don’t hand them this week)

It’s that time of year again when Farmer Bill asks us to save the seeds for one or two varieties of our Winter Squashes.

How to save Winter Squash seeds…

Mission…

1. Remove gunk
2. Dry out
3. prevent mold
4. Label correctly

If any of these actions are not accomplished the seeds need to be thrown out and your efforts will have been wasted

It’s VERY important to make sure you have the correct seeds saved and to label them correctly. If you don’t do this, the incorrect plant may hybridize with another similar plant which defeats the efforts of saving the seeds…it’s being done to save a particular variety of plant – not to create a new one.

1. Remove seeds from Winter Squash and get off all the gunk (not a botanical or culinary term but the best I can come up with at the moment) by putting the seeds in a bowl of water and rubbing the gunk off COMPLETELY
2. Once all the gunk is off, drain off the water in a colander
3. Spread out the seeds in a single layer on a baking tray or a large piece of cardboard or any non-porous surface (don’t use newspapers or paper towels as it may stick to the seeds and…there are reasons but the short version is the farmer doesn’t want ANYTHING stuck to the seeds)
4. Every day move the seeds around to help facilitate drying and prevent mold
5. Let them dry for a week or two…longer than you think would possibly be necessary (do not try and speed process along by drying in a microwave or oven…it will kill the seed…yes, it’s been done by CSA members in the past)
6. When completely dry, pack in a paper bag or wrap in newspaper (NEVER in anything plastic) and label exactly what they are…This week I believe it will be Winter Squash - Farsi
7. Save a few for yourself if you wish to grow them next season in your own garden but please return the rest to the CSA (leave at the sign-in table) as the farm needs them more than you do

Any questions about seed saving…please ask.



6. Upcoming events

Thursday, December 15th

3:30pm to 4:15pm

LI Rally Against Fracking
Mary Jane Davies Green
Plandome Rd (near the Manhasset train station)
Manhasset
For more info, a map, and to register (to let them know you’ll be coming):
http://action.foodandwaterwatch.org/p/salsa/event/common/public/?key=72273
Even though we may not have any natural gas, Long Islanders will be directly affected by hydraulic fracturing. Fracking upstate will increase our air pollution, and could send millions of gallons of toxic and radioactive wastewater to treatment facilities on Long Island. That is why this coming Thursday, Food and Water Watch, Grassroots Environmental Education and Reach Out America will be holding a rally to show that Long Islanders care about hydraulic fracturing. The rally will take place at the Mary Jane Davies Green in Manhasset- the small park right on Plandome Road, near the train Manhasset train station. Come, and bring as many friends and family members as possible!

Wednesday, December 21st

5 to 6pm

Bhavani nterviews Jonathan Bloom, author of American Wasteland
I Eat Green
Progressive Radio
To listen live or to listen to archived shows:
http://www.progressiveradionetwork.com/eating-green/

American Wasteland chronicles how we waste food from farm to fork and examines the impact of our squandering. In his blog, Wasted Food, Jonathan writes about why we waste food, why it matters and what we can do about it. American Wasteland was chosen by The Slow Food Huntington Book Club, as their first read, and as a passionate food advocate, Bhavani is so excited to have Jonathan Bloom as her guest!

The shows are also available on iTune to be downloaded on iPhones.


Friday to Sunday, January 20th to 22nd

30th Annual Organic Farming and Gardening Conference
NOFA-NY Winter Conference 2012
The Cooperative Economy
Saratoga Springs
New York
For more info and to register:
http://www.nofany.org/events/winter-conference


Saturday to Saturday, January 21st to 28th

Spa Cooking at Rancho la Puerta with Bhavani
Tecate, Mexico
For more info and to register:
http://www.rancholapuerta.com/activities/events/ev120121.html

Rancho La Puerta encompasses 3,000 picturesque acres, including a a six-acre organic farm! Rancho La Puerta’s Cooking School hosts cooking classes that celebrate the magic that happens whenever good cooks use just-picked local, seasonal, organically grown ingredients. This sensory experience, combined with your opportunity to cook, side-by-side with Bhavani, and then sit down to a fine meal you helped prepare, provides an unforgettable culinary experience.

Bhavani offers three hands-on cooking classes during which you will enjoy preparing your own meal along with fellow cooks. Classes take place at La Cocina Que Canta's culinary center. You also will have the opportunity to harvest produce from their organic garden, Tres Estrellas.

February 15th

3rd Annual No Farms, No Food Rally
Albany
For more info:
http://newyork.farmland.org/new-york-policy/2012-no-farms-no-food%c2%ae-rally-%e2%80%94february-15-albany

Join farmers, food advocates, local officials, environmentalists and other New Yorkers at the State Capitol to urge state leaders to support funding and legislation that protects farmland and the environment, increases the availability of nutritious food grown in New York and strengthens the farm and food economy. Bus transportation roundtrip from New York City to Albany will be available. Online registration is coming soon!


Friday and Saturday, February 24th and 25th

Fri – 8am to 7:30pm
Sat – 8am to 6pm

Eat. Work. Grow the Movement: Just Food’s 2012 Conference
Food and Finance High School
525 W 50th St
NYC
$15 to $50
To purchase tickets:
http://jfconference2012.eventbrite.com/
For more info:
http://justfood.org/events

Join Just Food, local food lovers and advocates, CSA members, community gardeners, urban and rural farmers, food professionals and entrepreneurs for two days of hands-on workshops, discussions, skill building sessions, and good food. Learn about cooking and food preservations techniques, CSA trends and the food justice movement in NYC and beyond, as well as ways you can mobilize to create good food projects in your own community.

On Friday, we’ll conclude with a Good Food Jobs Fair and on Saturday, we’ll celebrate the end of the conference with an Expo featuring exemplary local food artisans, sustainable businesses, and organizations.


Wednesday, February 29th

13th Annual Organic Turf Show
For more info and to register:
631-963-5454
http://neighborhood-network.org/index.htm

The Neighborhood Network Turf Show, which is designed for turf care professionals, features vendors of 100% natural horticulture products, and workshops on organic care of lawns, athletic fields, and even non-toxic indoor pest control. Come learn about the latest in organic turf and land care.

More info TBA.

February/March/April (date yet to be decided)
1st Long Island CSA Fair
More info TBA

Saturday, April 14th

8am to 6pm

Small Farm Summit 2012
Hofstra University
Uniondale
For more info or to volunteer and get involved:
http://www.longislandsmallfarmcentral.com/

Keynote speakers: Will Allen, CEO of Growing Power (featured in the movie Fresh) and Chef Ann Cooper, the Renegade Lunch Lady (former executive chef of the Ross School in East Hampton).

###

Thursday, December 8, 2011

Happy Autumn!

There’s NO ONE scheduled to work at the CSA this week between 5:30 and 7:30pm!!! Whether you owe CSA hours or not…whether you even planned on working this season or not…you could offer to help out…regardless. Besides, at the end of the CSA you have the opportunity to take extra produce from what’s left. This must be appealing to somebody…yes?

When is the last CSA pickup? December 15th.

Where are all the seeds from the Farsi Winter Squashes??? PLEASE save and return them (see below). Farmer Bill got the seeds when he was in Nepal so if you don’t return them, he can’t buy more and he’s not going back to Nepal any time soon…if ever.

PLEASE!!! I BEG OF YOU…DO NOT bring in Farsi Winter Squash seeds that are…wet (not even damp), in a plastic bag, unlabelled, and not Farsi Winter Squash seeds!!! They need to be the correct seeds, bone dry (may take one to two weeks) and then, and only then, put in something that breathes (NO – plastic/wax paper/parchment paper/tin foil, YES – paperbag, newspaper, paper towel, tissues, heck – even toilet paper), labeled Farsi Winter Squash (we weren’t asked to save any other one we received…Acorn and Butternut’s what I recall). And please don’t eat them. The farm needs them much more than anyone’s tummy does. These seeds are not available in this country and none of the Halseys are going to Nepal anytime soon to acquire more. If you want to grow them yourself, keep 10 (way more than enough) and give the rest back. Any questions, I’d be happy to answer (no question is too anything to not be asked…I think that’s what I’m trying to say ).

This week’s email includes…

1. HELP! Your CSA needs you this week!!! We’re looking for ONE (1) person from 3:30 to 5:30pm and THREE (3) folks to help from 5:30 to 7:30pm…
2. Cabbage recipe from first year CSA member and homeopath extraordinaire, Sonam Kushner (plus a couple more Cabbage recipes including the sexy one!)…
3. This week’s list…subject to change without notice (farming is like that)…
4. Dines Farm sighted in Huntington!
5. Saving seeds (FYI - the seeds will keep till next April if you don’t hand them in by next week)
6. Upcoming events
7. Notes from the Farm


1. HELP! Your CSA needs you this week!!! We’re looking for ONE (1) person from 3:30 to 5:30pm and THREE (3) folks to help from 5:30 to 7:30pm…

If you can be at the CSA from 3:30 to 5:30pm or 5:30 to 7:30pm this week please…
1. Respond to this email before 1pm Thursday
2. Call 631-421-4864 and leave a message before 1pm Thursday
2. Call the CSA at 631-385-1079 after 3pm THURSDAY ONLY and ask to speak to someone from the CSA and leave a message
3. Show up a little before 3:30pm or 5:30pm and see if there’s still any help needed

You can ALWAYS stop by the CSA a little before 3:30 or 5:30 to offer to help in case someone doesn’t show up (or is late) without letting anyone know.



2. Cabbage recipe from first year CSA member and homeopath extraordinaire, Sonam Kushner (plus a couple more Cabbage recipes including the sexy one!)…

Made this with last week's delicious Napa- tongue tingling, but delicious! From Gourmet Today. Serves 4.

1/4 cup rice vinegar
2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon grated peeled fresh ginger
1 serrano chile, finely chopped, including seeds
2 tablespoons vegetable oil.
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 pound Napa cabbage, core and cut crosswise into 1/2 " wide slices (8 cups)
1 bunch scallions
1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro

Whisk together vinegar, sugar, ginger, chile, oil and salt in a large bowl until salt is dissolved. Add remaining ingredients and toss well. Let stand, tossing occasionally, until vegetables are slightly wilted, for about 10 minutes before serving.

Good with steamed white rice, roasted sweet potatoes and fried sesame tofu (Simple Suppers from Moosewood).

Especially good at the end of a very rainy day!

Sexy Cabbage recipe!
http://www.amateurgourmet.com/2011/11/sexy-cabbage-sexytime.html#more-7057

And one that could possibly set your kitchen on fire and burn out your eyes and throat! 
http://orangette.blogspot.com/2009/01/best-we-can-hope-for.html



3. This week’s list…subject to change without notice (farming is like that!)

December 8, 2011

1. Cauliflower: Cheddar OR White, OR Broccoli: Purple – 1 head total
2. Carrots – to be weighed
3. Kale: Lacinato* – 1 bunch
4. Pak Choi: Red – 1 bunch (see Bok Choi Info Sheet)
5. Scallions – 1 bunch
6. Mustard Greens: Green OR Red – 1 bunch

Total Items: 7 (?)

Herb Share – Dec 1A (the end!)
Rosemary AND Sage

*Also know as…Black Kale, Black Tuscan Palm, Cavolo Nero, Dinosaur Kale, Flat Back Cabbage, Nero di Toscana, Palm Tree Kale, Tuscan Cabbage, Tuscan Kale…the Latin is Brassica oleracea



4. Dines Farm sighted in Huntington!

I had to see for myself so I showed up at the LI Winter Market last Saturday at Sweet Hollow Hall in Melville and lo and behold…there was Jay Dines grilling away.

Here’s the info for the LI Winter Market…
http://winterfarmersmarketlongisland.com/

And check out their Facebook page as well to keep updated as to the ever changing days and hours of this market.



5. Saving Seeds

It’s that time of year again when Farmer Bill asks us to save the seeds for one or two varieties of our Winter Squashes.

How to save Winter Squash seeds…

Mission…

1. Remove gunk
2. Dry out
3. prevent mold
4. Label correctly

If any of these actions are not accomplished the seeds need to be thrown out and your efforts will have been wasted

It’s VERY important to make sure you have the correct seeds saved and to label them correctly. If you don’t do this, the incorrect plant may hybridize with another similar plant which defeats the efforts of saving the seeds…it’s being done to save a particular variety of plant – not to create a new one.

1. Remove seeds from Winter Squash and get off all the gunk (not a botanical or culinary term but the best I can come up with at the moment) by putting the seeds in a bowl of water and rubbing the gunk off COMPLETELY
2. Once all the gunk is off, drain off the water in a colander
3. Spread out the seeds in a single layer on a baking tray or a large piece of cardboard or any non-porous surface (don’t use newspapers or paper towels as it may stick to the seeds and…there are reasons but the short version is the farmer doesn’t want ANYTHING stuck to the seeds)
4. Every day move the seeds around to help facilitate drying and prevent mold
5. Let them dry for a week or two…longer than you think would possibly be necessary (do not try and speed process along by drying in a microwave or oven…it will kill the seed…yes, it’s been done by CSA members in the past)
6. When completely dry, pack in a paper bag or wrap in newspaper (NEVER in anything plastic) and label exactly what they are…This week I believe it will be Winter Squash - Farsi
7. Save a few for yourself if you wish to grow them next season in your own garden but please return the rest to the CSA (leave at the sign-in table) as the farm needs them more than you do

Any questions about seed saving…please ask.



6. Upcoming events

Saturday, December 11th

4 to 8pm

NOFA-NY Long Island Chapter Holiday Party
Brickhouse Brewery
67 W Main St
Patchogue, NY
$30 per person for NOFA-NY members; $35 for non-members
For more info call:
631-447-2337
http://www.brickhousebrewery.com/

Includes buffet dinner, tax & tip.
Cash bar for Brickhouse Brewery's own microbrews


Monday, December 12th

8pm

Slow Food Huntington Steering Committee Meeting
Sky Room Cafe
Cinema Arts Centre
423 Park Ave
Huntington
Please RSVP if you plan on attending. If you cannot attend this meeting and would still like to participate, please contact us.
http://slowfoodhuntington.org

At our last meeting it was decided to finally create a steering committee to write bylaws for our chapter. All current members of Slow Food USA affiliated with our chapter are welcome to participate. Please contact us if you’re interested in being part of this committee.

Wednesday, December 14th

7:30pm

Dive! Featuring guest speaker, Jon Stepanian (founder of LI Food Not Bombs)
Cinema Arts Centre
423 Park Ave
Huntington
$9 – Members/$13 – General Public (includes a post-film Reception)
To purchase advance tickets (it probably will sell out)…
http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/213464
For more info:
631 423-7610
http://www.cinemaartscentre.org/011/Films_On_Food.html#Dive
http://www.divethefilm.com/

Inspired by a curiosity about our country's careless habit of sending food straight to landfills, this multi award-winning documentary follows filmmaker Jeremy Seifert and friends as they dumpster dive in the back alleys and gated garbage receptacles of Los Angeles' supermarkets. In the process, they salvage thousands of dollars worth of good, edible food - resulting in an inspiring documentary that is equal parts entertainment, guerilla journalism and call to action.

Our guest speaker, Jon Stepanian, and his team of volunteers, collect thousands of pounds of perfectly healthy, nutritious and safe food from our local supermarkets and distribute it to our local community each week through “food shares.” This is food that would otherwise end up in dumpsters due to close expiration date or minor imperfections. LI Food Not Bombs hands out a week’s worth of groceries to about 3,000 people each week – an average of 20lbs per person. Jon will present a short video clip of their work and lead a discussion of this fascinating, and shocking side of our food system.



Friday to Sunday, January 20th to 22nd

30th Annual Organic Farming and Gardening Conference
NOFA-NY Winter Conference 2012
The Cooperative Economy
Saratoga Springs
New York
For more info and to register:
http://www.nofany.org/events/winter-conference


February 24th and 25th

Eat. Work. Grow the Movement: Just Food’s 2012 Conference
NYC
More info TBA

The conference will include participatory workshops, a sustainable food jobs fair and local food expo, and panel discussions with urban and rural farmers and food entrepreneurs. Learn about the food justice movement in New York City and beyond, as well as ways you can mobilize to create good food projects in your own community.

February/March/April (date yet to be decided)
1st Long Island CSA Fair
More info TBA

Saturday, April 14th

8am to 6pm

Small Farm Summit 2012
Hofstra University
Uniondale

Keynote speakers: Will Allen, CEO of Growing Power (featured in the movie Fresh) and Chef Ann Cooper, the Renegade Lunch Lady (former executive chef of the Ross School in East Hampton).

More info TBA



7. Notes from the Farm

November 18, 2011

Our CSA season is coming to an end….our last delivery being the 2nd week in December.

As is true every year, some crops have done well…and others not. Tomatoes, Carrots, fall greens, and Beans all did well. White Beets, Sweet Potatoes and Arugula…not so well. Other crops did about right – Peppers, Eggplants, Summer Squashes, Strawberries, and Peas.

Over the season we tried to bring in a large assortment of varieties of all these vegetables. Some things you are familiar with and others…maybe not. Part of our farm’s goal is to preserve the biodiversity of our planet’s food crops. By having a market for some of these minor crops through our CSAs, seed companies will continue to offer them and expand their offerings. Many of these crops are very well known in their region of origin – Chiogga Beets, Chiogga Radicchio, Travisio Radicchio, Siberian Kale, Japanese Daikons, Chinese Flat Pea, Dutch Dragon Tongue Beans and Middle Eastern Summer Squash are just some of the varieties brought in to you all this year.

So, enjoy the last several weeks of the CSA and THANK YOU…each and every one of you…for helping our organic farm survive into the 21st century!

Organically yours,
Farm Bill (Halsey)


December 2011

Our season is about over…last deliveries being the week of December 13th.

THANK YOU…to all our CSA members for supporting our Green Thumb certified organic family farm. It’s through our CSA member’s support we are able to keep our farm intact and growing.

There are ups and downs in every season and this one was no exception, but by having a diverse crop selection we are able to continually bring in a wide selection and variety of locally grown certified organic produce.

We’re still learning about what we grow and how to do it better. It’s always a challenge. That’s just part of what keeps it all so interesting. That, and being able to grow such a wide selection of food. Over 350 different varieties of seeds were planted this year, as well as 8 types of Strawberries, Rhubarb, and 40 kinds of Flowers. We enjoy what we’re doing and hope you all enjoyed the fruits and veggies of our labors!

THANK YOU ALL AGAIN!

May you all have a happy and safe holiday season, and we hope to see you all in a few months (April is not so far away).

Organically yours,
Farmer Bill (Halsey)

###

Thursday, December 1, 2011

Happy Autumn!

When is the last CSA pickup? December 15th.

Green Thumb Farm’s farmstand out in Water Mill closes for the season on Sunday December 4th if you want to catch their end of season sale on non-perishables.

Where are all the seeds from the Farsi Winter Squashes??? PLEASE save and return them (see below). Farmer Bill got the seeds when he was in Nepal so if you don’t return them, he can’t buy more and he’s not going back to Nepal any time soon…if ever.

PLEASE!!! I BEG OF YOU…DO NOT bring in Farsi Winter Squash seeds that are…wet (not even damp), in a plastic bag, unlabelled, and not Farsi Winter Squash seeds!!! They need to be the correct seeds, bone dry (may take one to two weeks) and then, and only then, put in something that breathes (NO – plastic/wax paper/parchment paper/tin foil, YES – paperbag, newspaper, paper towel, tissues, heck – even toilet paper), labeled Farsi Winter Squash (we weren’t asked to save any other one we received…Acorn and Butternut’s what I recall). And please don’t eat them. The farm needs them much more than anyone’s tummy does. These seeds are not available in this country and none of the Halseys are going to Nepal anytime soon to acquire more. If you want to grow them yourself, keep 10 (way more than enough) and give the rest back. Any questions, I’d be happy to answer (no question is too anything to not be asked…I think that’s what I’m trying to say ).

This week’s email includes…

1. HELP! Your CSA needs you this week!!! We’re looking for ONE (1) person from 3:30 to 5:30pm…
2. Interesting article about root vegetables…
3. This week’s list…subject to change without notice (farming is like that)…
4. It’s holiday time so here’s a gift idea…
5. Saving seeds


1. HELP! Your CSA needs you this week!!! We’re looking for ONE (1) person from 3:30 to 5:30pm…

If you can be at the CSA from 3:30 to 5:30pm this week please…
1. Respond to this email before 1pm Thursday
2. Call 631-421-4864 and leave a message before 1pm Thursday
2. Call the CSA at 631-385-1079 after 3pm THURSDAY ONLY and ask to speak to someone from the CSA and leave a message
3. Show up a little before 3:30pm and see if there’s still any help needed

You can ALWAYS stop by the CSA a little before 3:30 or 5:30 to offer to help in case someone doesn’t show up (or is late) without letting anyone know.

If you didn’t keep track of how many hours you’ve worked and are waiting to get the info from me, I should be finished (I started but it’s a bigger job than I thought wrangling all the little bits of paper) by Monday.



2. Interesting article about root vegetables…

Great article about eating root vegetables submitted by CSA member Jeff Tanenbaum. This article mentions John Jeavons (all too briefly)…the founder of Gro-Biointensive agriculture with whom I had the privilege of studying with…
http://scienceblogs.com/casaubonsbook/2011/11/vegeculture_and_the_season_of.php?utm_source=nytwidget



3. This week’s list…subject to change without notice (farming is like that!)

December 1, 2011

1. Cabbage: Green OR Napa – 1 head
2. Lettuce – 1 bag
3. Kohlrabi – 1 bunch
4. Cilantro OR Curly Cress* OR Dill – 1 bunch
5. Mei Quing Choi – 1 bunch
6. Radishes – 1 bunch
7. Cauliflower, Green – 1 head

Total Items: 7 (?)

* Curly Cress (also know as Pepper Cress/grass and Cressida…Lepidium sativum…in the mustard family)…salads, sandwiches
http://noteatingoutinny.com/2009/04/20/peppercress-and-poached-egg-salad/
http://en.allexperts.com/q/Herbs-720/Garden-Cress.htm
http://www.foodsubs.com/Greensld.html



4. It’s holiday time so here’s a gift idea…

Truffles (raw, vegan and gluten-free) made by a mom and her two daughters help fund their permaculture/organic farm/garden projects…

http://www.blackbirdnaturals.com/eat-cacao-truffles/

They also sell dried Herbs (medicinal and their own Stevia), and unusual seeds for your garden such as Goji Berry and Holy Basil.

These Truffles were featured on the Cooking Channel show Foodcrafters.



5. Saving Seeds

It’s that time of year again when Farmer Bill asks us to save the seeds for one or two varieties of our Winter Squashes.

How to save Winter Squash seeds…

Mission…

1. Remove gunk
2. Dry out
3. prevent mold
4. Label correctly

If any of these actions are not accomplished the seeds need to be thrown out and your efforts will have been wasted

It’s VERY important to make sure you have the correct seeds saved and to label them correctly. If you don’t do this, the incorrect plant may hybridize with another similar plant which defeats the efforts of saving the seeds…it’s being done to save a particular variety of plant – not to create a new one.

1. Remove seeds from Winter Squash and get off all the gunk (not a botanical or culinary term but the best I can come up with at the moment) by putting the seeds in a bowl of water and rubbing the gunk off COMPLETELY
2. Once all the gunk is off, drain off the water in a colander
3. Spread out the seeds in a single layer on a baking tray or a large piece of cardboard or any non-porous surface (don’t use newspapers or paper towels as it may stick to the seeds and…there are reasons but the short version is the farmer doesn’t want ANYTHING stuck to the seeds)
4. Every day move the seeds around to help facilitate drying and prevent mold
5. Let them dry for a week or two…longer than you think would possibly be necessary (do not try and speed process along by drying in a microwave or oven…it will kill the seed…yes, it’s been done by CSA members in the past)
6. When completely dry, pack in a paper bag or wrap in newspaper (NEVER in anything plastic) and label exactly what they are…This week I believe it will be Winter Squash - Farsi
7. Save a few for yourself if you wish to grow them next season in your own garden but please return the rest to the CSA (leave at the sign-in table) as the farm needs them more than you do

Any questions about seed saving…please ask.

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